New York’s Extended Producer Responsibility Bill Needs a Redo, Leaving Paper Out

by Clara Cozort | Apr 27, 2021

The recycling rate for paper has exceeded 63% every year since 2009The New York Daily News recently ran an editorial on Albany’s proposed extended producer responsibility (EPR) bill. We agree with the editorial, and its headline statement to New York lawmakers: “Recycle This Legislative Language.”  

Albany must revise a proposed bill on EPR, keeping paper out of it. This proposed bill would be a devastating blow to the paper and paper-based packaging industry in New York, which employs approximately 28,000 people with family-sustaining jobs. 

EPR is a solution for harder to recycle products and hazardous materials, not paper.  

Paper has a consistently high recycling rate, meeting or exceeding 63 percent for over a decade.  

U.S. packaging and pulp producers are also committed to investing more than $4.1 billion in manufacturing infrastructure, from 2019-2023, to continue the best use of recovered fiber in our products.   

Albany’s EPR scheme is a regressive solution in search of a problem. EPR fees paid by producers would reduce capital available to support further investments in paper recycling.  

So please, toss this bill into the recycle bin. It needs a redo

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New York’s Extended Producer Responsibility Bill Needs a Redo, Leaving Paper Out

by Clara Cozort | Apr 27, 2021

The recycling rate for paper has exceeded 63% every year since 2009The New York Daily News recently ran an editorial on Albany’s proposed extended producer responsibility (EPR) bill. We agree with the editorial, and its headline statement to New York lawmakers: “Recycle This Legislative Language.”  

Albany must revise a proposed bill on EPR, keeping paper out of it. This proposed bill would be a devastating blow to the paper and paper-based packaging industry in New York, which employs approximately 28,000 people with family-sustaining jobs. 

EPR is a solution for harder to recycle products and hazardous materials, not paper.  

Paper has a consistently high recycling rate, meeting or exceeding 63 percent for over a decade.  

U.S. packaging and pulp producers are also committed to investing more than $4.1 billion in manufacturing infrastructure, from 2019-2023, to continue the best use of recovered fiber in our products.   

Albany’s EPR scheme is a regressive solution in search of a problem. EPR fees paid by producers would reduce capital available to support further investments in paper recycling.  

So please, toss this bill into the recycle bin. It needs a redo


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